Arkansas Viagra Melanoma Lawsuit

Viagra Melanoma Lawsuit
“Viagra tablet” by Tim.Reckmann, used under CC BY/cropped from original

Viagra is a popular medication that is often prescribed to men who suffer from erectile dysfunction. Viagra is also prescribed under the name Revatio to men who suffer from pulmonary arterial hypertension. A Viagra Melanoma lawsuit alleges that drug maker Pfizer has failed to inform users about the potential melanoma causing side effects of Viagra.

If you or loved one took Viagra and subsequently developed skin cancer, contact an Arkansas Viagra Lawsuit attorney at the Johnson & Vines Law Firm today. We offer free, no obligation consultations, and we can help you determine whether you have a claim. You can contact us by filling out the form on this page, calling us at 501-777-7777, or emailing us at [email protected].

Important: The time you have to pursue a claim is limited. Contact us for more information.

Is There a Connection Between Skin Cancer and Viagra?

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer. But melanoma is a rare and deadly form. Although skin cancer is often treatable, a small percentage of people who develop melanoma experience life-threatening complications, including death.

According to a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), men who use Viagra have up to an 84 percent chance of developing Melanoma. This study was performed with 25,848 men and took place over a 10-year period. The study yielded the following results.

  • 142 men developed Melanoma
  • 580 men developed Squamous Cell Carcinoma
  • 3,030 men developed Basal Cell Carcinoma

The results concluded that once erectile dysfunction was eliminated as a cause, Viagra contributed to a significantly higher risk of melanoma. The way the drug acts on certain cellular pathways may encourage skin cancer cells to spread to other parts of the body. Once cancer starts to spread throughout the body, it is hard to treat and can lead to death.

Recent research suggests that Viagra may lower immunity and decrease the ability to fight off certain types of skin cancer. The medication reportedly impedes the production of the cancer-fighting protein PDE5A, which can lead to development and spread of cancer.

Melanoma can have the following symptoms:

  • Increase in moles
  • Abnormally shaped moles
  • Slow-healing wounds
  • Bleeding or weeping moles and skin
  • Moles larger than an inch in diameter
  • Inflamed, itchy or swollen patches of skin

In many cases, the early signs of skin cancer are often overlooked, and the disease is not caught until it has progressed to the more severe stages.

Arkansas Viagra Lawsuit AttorneyViagra Melanoma Lawsuit

Lawsuits allege that Pfizer knew about Viagra’s role in the development of skin cancer and failed to inform the public and medical community about the risks associated with Viagra use. Although a link has been established between melanoma and Viagra, Pfizer has reportedly not added warnings to its labels or issued advisements to the medical community regarding its use and link between skin cancer and Viagra.

Because of the lack of warnings from the drug’s manufacturer about the correlation between Viagra and skin cancer, men filing a Viagra Melanoma lawsuit claim they were not able to seek out early detection to improve their prognosis.

The Time You Have to Pursue a Claim is Limited. Contact Us Today.

If you have questions about a Viagra melanoma lawsuit, or if you want to speak with an Arkansas Viagra lawsuit attorney, contact the Johnson & Vines law firm today. You can contact us by filling out the form on this page, calling us at 501-777-7777, or emailing us at [email protected].

After you contact us, an attorney will follow up with you to get more information about your case. There is no cost or obligation to speak with us, and all of the information you provide is confidential.

Please note that the law limits the time you have to pursue a claim or file a lawsuit for an injury. If you think you have a case, you should not delay taking action.